Antioxidants
Home Legal Advice Health Counseling Jobs, Careers General Advice Contact Search Privacy Policy Forum

Femtalk USA - Cancer Section


Antioxidants

 

 

 

 

Antioxidants

Antioxidants are substances or nutrients in our foods which can prevent or slow the oxidative damage to our body. When our body cells use oxygen, they naturally produce free radicals (by-products) which can cause damage. Antioxidants act as "free radical scavengers" and hence prevent and repair damage done by these free radicals.  Health problems such as cancer, heart disease, macular degeneration, diabetes, are all contributed by oxidative damage. A recent study conducted by researchers from London found that 5 servings of fruits and vegetables reduce the risk of stroke by 25 percent. Antioxidants may also enhance immune defense and therefore lower the risk of cancer and infection.

Antioxidants are found abundant in beans, grain products, fruits and vegetables. Look for fruits with bright color - lutein in some of the yellow pigments found in corn; orange in cantaloupe, butternut squash and mango; red from lycopene in tomatoes and watermelon, and purple and blue in berries. So enjoy eating a variety of these products. It is best to obtain these antioxidants from foods instead of supplements. In addition, minimize the exposure of oxidative stress such as smoking and sunburn.

Which natural foods are rich in antioxidants?

Antioxidants are abundant in fruits and vegetables, as well as in other foods including nuts, grains and some meats, poultry and fish. The list below describes food sources of common antioxidants.

Beta-carotene is found in many foods that are orange in color, including sweet potatoes, carrots, cantaloupe, squash, apricots, pumpkin, and mangos. Some green leafy vegetables including collard greens, spinach, and kale are also rich in beta-carotene.

Lutein, best known for its association with healthy eyes, is abundant in green, leafy vegetables such as collard greens, spinach, and kale.

Lycopene is a potent antioxidant found in tomatoes, watermelon, guava, papaya, apricots, pink grapefruit, blood oranges, and other foods.

Estimates suggest 85 percent of American dietary intake of lycopene comes from tomatoes and tomato products.  
 

Cancer cures and advice Index

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 






 

 






 

 

Selenium is a mineral, not an antioxidant nutrient. However, it is a component of antioxidant enzymes. Natural plant foods like rice and wheat are the major dietary sources of selenium in most countries. The amount of selenium in soil, which varies by region, determines the amount of selenium in the foods grown in that soil. Animals that eat grains or plants grown in selenium-rich soil have higher levels of selenium in their muscle. In the United States, meats and bread are common sources of dietary selenium. Brazil nuts also contain large quantities of selenium. Fish and shellfish, red meat, grains, eggs, chicken and garlic.

Vitamin A is found in three main forms: retinol (Vitamin A1), 3,4-didehydroretinol (Vitamin A2), and 3-hydroxy-retinol (Vitamin A3). Foods rich in vitamin A include liver, sweet potatoes, carrots, milk, egg yolks and mozzarella cheese. Carrots, squash, broccoli, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, kale, collards, cantaloupe, peaches and apricots.

Vitamin C is also called ascorbic acid, and can be found in high abundance in many fruits and vegetables and is also found in cereals, beef, poultry, fish, citrus fruits like oranges and lime etc, green peppers, broccoli, green leafy vegetables, strawberries and tomatoes.

Vitamin E, also known as alpha-tocopherol, is found in almonds, in many oils including wheat germ, safflower, corn and soybean oils, and also found in mangos, nuts, broccoli and other foods. Nuts & seeds, whole grains, green leafy vegetables, vegetable oil and liver oil

Other anti-oxidants
Flavonoids / polyphenols
    Soy, Red wine, Purple grapes, Pomegranate, Cranberries, Tea

Lycopene
    Tomato and tomato products, Pink grapefruit, Watermelon

Lutein
    Dark green vegetables such as kale, broccoli, kiwi, brussels sprout and spinach

Lignan
    Flax seed, Oatmeal, Barley, Rye

 Next -
Food preparation and use

Please read legal disclaimer
Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The products and information contained herein are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any diseases or medical problems. This is not intended to replace your doctor's recommendations. The information is provided for educational purposes only. Nutritional benefits may vary from one person to another.

 

 

 

 

 

 Copyright FemtalkUSA 2009
For problems or questions regarding this web contact
[alip2@earthlink.net].